Edwinstowe Hall

Edwinstowe Hall 2018

Before the Hall was built –

Edwinstowe was divided into two portions. The higher village, Edwinstowe ‘on the Hill’ and the Lower village by the River Maun, Edwinstowe ‘by the Water’. In 1327, William, son of Ralph-of-the-Hill of Edenstowe is said to have resided where the hall now stands.

In 1332, there were 27 families listed in the village. Some following eviction from Rufford and Cratley by Rufford Abbey who sought to increase pasture for sheep due to the pre-­‐Black Death growing wool trade.

This early map, dated 1638, shows no hall but the size of the village and the position of the church. The inclosure (Free Land) identifies Mediaeval three-field system.

The Hall was built about 1702 on land owned by the Duke of Newcastle. The stables and out-buildings were built after 1740. The village had grown significantly over the previous 100 years.

The hall was modernised in the 1750s and Pevsner scholar of the history of art dated the drawing room ceiling to 1751.

The ceiling today, is beautifully preserved and the detail is crisp and clear.

The  Hall, in 1770, like many other buildings in the area, would have to have paid Window Tax. Some houses in the village blocked up windows to save money. Documents show that the owners of the Hall did not pay the tax, possibly as it was a rented property. At this time a new saying was coined, ‘Daylight Robbery’. 

Etching 1790

By the early 1800s the Hall had increased its lands to include most of the Free Land. Wings to the main house and outbuildings had also been added. 

The Scarboroughs had occupied the building since the mid 18th century.

In the mid 1800s, the Rev. Lumley (Earl of Scarborough) lived at the hall, leased from the Duke of Portland of Welbeck Abbey. After this, it passed into the hands of Earl Manvers of Ollerton Hall. Lumley then became 7th Duke of Scarborough, later, he inherited Rufford Abbey but never lived there. The Hall is listed at that time as having ‘pleasure gardens, stables and a kitchen garden 

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Acknowledgement Wikipedia

Then over the years it was let to various gentlemen.

  • 1858 Mr. F. Bryon

  • 1862 R. H. Walpole .

  • 1863 H. Cunliffe (Census in 1871 shows these residents) – Henry Cunliffe Shaw 37, Geraldine 31, Edith Mary 6, Laura 5

Their staff included:

Mary Gibson – Cook

Annie Calvert – Maid

Mary Jones – Nurse

Sarah Ellison – Housemaid

John Webber – Butler

William Webber – Footman

Robert Jones – Groom.

  • 1874 John Burrows 

The next resident was James Fane Alexander – born 1846. He married in 1884, Aurea Otway Mayne born 1860 in Aurangabad, India. Her father was a distinguished Major of the 17th Lancers. Their three sons were born at the Hall. Paul and William, rose to high army rank. Charles became a Rear-Admiral. Aurea lived at the hall until 1912. (See Alexander Family in People/Families section)

Acknowledgement Wikipedia

The Alexander Family at the Rufford Hunt

Burglary at Edwinstowe Hall April 1886:

Reported in the ‘Mansfield Reporter’ an alleged robbery at the hall. The butler and gardener were brought before Magistrates. This case had excited considerable interest in the neighbourhood of Edwinstowe & Worksop and  was heard yesterday at Worksop Police Court . Allegedly a quantity of silver was stolen by a notorious gang of burgulars.

At Newark & Retford Quarter Sessions. Actually, Thomas & Meadows were on bail for stealing 4 shirts, 37 collars, 2 pairs of socks, 22 lbs of candles, 14 lbs. of soap, 4 bottles of blacking – goods of James Alexander. Mr. Appleton prosecuted & Mr. H. Y. Stanger defended. Mr. Stanger stated that there might have been irregularity in these proceedings, but there was no felonious intent.

The jury returned a verdict of Not guilty.

Late 1800s Servants at Edwinstowe Hall. Were these the men who were wrongly accused?

James died in 1891 aged 45 in the Bahamas. His body travelled on the White Star Line Adriatic. A luxury floating hotel.

Acknowledgement Wikipedia

Grave of James Fane Alexander & his wife Aurea Otway Mayne.

This window was placed here by Aurea – 23rd June, 1869.                            Subject – Archangels: St. Michael, St Gabriel and St. Raphael (Health & Healing & travel) Created by the glass works – Whirefriars, James Powell & Sons of London.  In memory of Capt. James Fane Alexander of  the 17thLancers.

A party from Edwinstowe Hall were guests when the Prince and Princess of Wales visited Welbeck Abbey in 1896. Mrs. Alexander wore white satin with triple frilled sleeves of deep crimson, a tiara of diamonds and carried a magnificent bouquet of scarlet blossoms.

In 1897, she married Major Ralph Henry Fenwick Lombe. The Lombes rode to hounds and entered horses in equestrian events. He became a Justice of the Peace and until he moved in 1911, to Grafton Manor, Northamps.

1901 Census, Mrs. Aurea Lombe (formerly Alexander) had her late husband’s mother, Mrs. Julia Alexander living with her.

She gave Aurea an embroidered fire-screen as a wedding present in April 1899. Designed by William Morris.

Memorial to Julia Charlotte Alexander in St. Mary’s church. After her death she left the sum of £58,000.

 

Edwinstowe Hall c1906.

Edwinstowe Hall in 1923    A Welfare Centre………

In a newspaper advertisement announcing the sale of Edwinstowe Hall by Lord Manvers in November, 1919, the hall was accurately described as a substantially built and commodious residence with extensive pleasure grounds, gardens and park-like grasslands, glasshouses and an excellent range of stables and motor-garages.

Clearly impressive, the Bolsover Colliery Company who were planning to sink a new mine on the outskirts of the village, acquired the hall and grounds from the 1st January, 1920, and, over a period of 3½ years, converted it into a Welfare Centre for the use of the various organisations which the company set up for its employees.

The Welfare Centre was opened in August, 1923, by the Duke of Portland who, in a formal ceremony, used a gold key to enter the refurbished hall, and then walked over to the dormitories which he opened with the same key.

Companies of boys’ and girls’ brigades and ambulance divisions marched past a ceremonial platform, accompanied by massed brass bands and the Duke made a speech to the assembled throng.

Tea was provided in the hall, in the dining rooms of the dormitories and in marquees.

The photograph is of a similar parade of the representatives of six colliery villages en route to Edwinstowe Hall on the occasion of George V’s Jubilee celebrations in 1935.

Acknowledgement Acorn magazine, Margaret Woodhead and Dennis Wood

 Edwinstowe Hall n.d.

Edwinstowe Hall Fair 1980

The Mulberry Tree at Edwinstowe Hall

We have all been round the mulberry bush, in imaginative play while singing the traditional nursery rhyme “On a Cold and Frosty Morning”.

Did you know, however, that the rhyme has its origin in the exercise yard of Wakefield Jail, where the prisoners walked around the mulberry tree planted in the middle?

There was a listed mulberry tree in the spacious grounds of Edwinstowe Hall and, like several other trees in the gardens, it was reputed to be over 200 years old.

There are twelve species of mulberry trees, all of which are becoming increasingly rare in Britain with the disappearance of many large old gardens. The black mulberry (Morus Nigra) is the species most commonly cultivated for its fruit which is similar in shape to a blackberry and can be eaten raw. The leaves of the white mulberry are the food for silkworms.

Mulberry Tree wikipedeia

Edwinstowe Hall’s tree was a black mulberry with a rough-scaled trunk and heart shaped, toothed leaves. The tree, sadly, died many years ago.

Acknowledgement D. Wood Acorn Magazine

Edwinstowe Hall Pit Band c1979